A Perfect Choice For New Hampshire Gardens

AND THE WINNER IS… 2017 PERENNIAL OF THE YEAR

The Perfect Perennial for Lakes Region Gardens

Asclepias tuberosa – butterfly weed


With all the ”buzz” about bees and butterflies, BUTTERFLY WEED is an excellent plant choice for the 2017 Perennial of the Year. Known for its ability to support insects and birds and serve as the primary caterpillar food for the beloved North American native Monarch butterfly, it puts out 3 months of tangerine/orange blooms on perfect little upright shrubs 24” tall and wide.

Hummingbirds, bees, beneficial insects, and other butterflies also love the flowers, which are laden with pollen and nectar. They grow best in full sun, are deer resistant, and tolerant of wet or dry soils. They are hardy to zones 3-9, and native throughout almost all of the Eastern states.

Since Asclepias tuberosa is a native prairie plant, butterfly weed is quite comfortable in meadow gardens, native plantings and wildlife sanctuaries but is finding its way into more formal to semi-formal urban gardens. Plant it in large masses, for an unrivaled display of eye-popping orange. Butterfly weed pairs well with summer blooming Phlox, Hemerocallis, Liatris, Echinacea, Salvia, and most of June/July sun-loving perennials.

The Perennial Plant of the Year showcases a perennial that is a standout among its competitors. Perennials chosen are suitable for a wide range of growing climates, require low maintenance, have multiple-season interest, and are relatively pest/disease-free. If you are looking for an excellent perennial for your next landscape project or something reliable for your gardens, make sure to check out the Perennial Plant of the Year™ archive list. At Miracle Farms we often chose plants on the list of past Perennial of the Year winners to be reliable bloomers year after year.

Here is the list we often choose from:

Previous PPA Perennial Plant of the Year winners:

  • 2016 Anemone × hybrida ‘Honorine Jobert’ (windflower)
  • 2015 Geranium ‘Biokova’ (dwarf cranesbill, hardy geranium)
  • 2014 Panicum virgatum ‘Northwind’ (tall switch grass)
  • 2013 Polygonatum odoratum variegatum (Solomon’s seal)
  • 2012 Brunnera macrophylla ‘Jack Frost’ (Siberian bugloss)
  • 2011 Amsonia hubrichtii (blue star)
  • 2010 Baptisia australis (blue false indigo)
  • 2009 Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’ (Japanese forest grass)
  • 2008 Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (cranesbill, hardy geranium)
  • 2007 Nepeta racemosa ‘Walker’s Low’ (catmint)
  • 2006 Dianthus ‘Feuerhexe’ (aka ‘Firewitch’) (cheddar pink)
  • 2005 Helleborus x hybridus (hellebore, Lenten rose)
  • 2004 Athyrium niponicum pictum (Japanese painted fern)
  • 2003 Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Becky’ (shasta daisy)
  • 2002 Phlox paniculata ‘David’ (garden phlox)
  • 2001 Calamagrostis x acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’ (feather reed grass)
  • 2000 Scabiosa ‘Butterfly Blue’ (pincushion flower)
  • 1999 Rudbeckia fulgida sullivantii ‘Goldsturm’ (black-eyed Susan)
  • 1998 Echinacea purpurea ‘Magnus’ (purple coneflower)
  • 1997 Salvia x sylvestris ‘Mainacht’ (aka ‘May Night’ ) (wood sage)
  • 1996 Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (beardtongue)
  • 1995 Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian sage)
  • 1994 Astilbe ‘Sprite’ (dwarf astilbe)
  • 1993 Veronica ‘Sunny Border Blue’ (speedwell)
  • 1992 Coreopsis verticillata ‘Moonbeam’ (threadleaf coreopsis)
  • 1991 Heuchera micrantha diversifolia ‘Palace Purple’ (coral bells)
  • 1990 Phlox stolonifera (creeping phlox)

Fall Is The Time To Aerate Lakes Region Lawns

lawnmachine-laid-wall

In order to maintain a healthy lawn, your soil requires water, air, and nutrients. Lawns become compacted with normal use including foot traffic and lawn mowing. All lawns need aerating at some point, but depending on the conditions and use of your lawn, your soil may require aerating more or less often than typical.

Lawn aeration is the process of mechanically removing 2”-4” soil plugs and small portions of thatch from the lawn. Lawn aeration relieves soil compaction and improves the ability of roots to grow deeper into the soil and expand. Aeration is generally recognized as the best way to improve air and gas exchange, along with water and fertilizer intake. Lawns that receive this care will be healthier, easier to maintain and have fewer pest problems than lawns that are neglected. It is preferable to aerate your lawn in the fall when new root development is more prevalent.

You should be able to see the ‘thatch’ layer, as it should be about 1/2″ thick or so just underneath the grass and above the dirt. “Thatch” refers to the non-decomposed layer of organic material between the soil surface and the living grasses. When thatch build up becomes too thick, the turf’s roots cannot receive proper airflow, nutrients or water. This leads to thin, patchy, and yellowing grass. This is when aeration becomes necessary.

Some homeowners have trouble determining if unhealthy grass is due to soil compaction, thatch buildup, or another issue, such as poor fertilization. Let Miracle Farms help you to determine the best plan to get your lawn in tip-top condition. Don’t have time to aerate your lawn, or have a large property that needs aeration? Our lawn care experts would be happy to provide the help you need!

 

Japanese Beetles on Vacation in the Lakes Region, NH?

japanese beetle damage on roses

japanese beetle damage on roses

So one day your roses were covered in colorful blooms and then the next day… gone! Chances are the culprit is the dreaded Japanese beetle.  It’s late in the season for beetle damage here in the Lakes Region, but my knock out roses are still being devoured.  The telltale sign, along with an extreme lack of blooms, are skeletonized leaves and even complete defoliation. Usually, the demons can be caught in the act. Japanese beetles also love to eat rosebuds – every last one that you’ve been anxiously awaiting.

If you are unfamiliar with Japanese beetles, they have shiny, metallic green and copper colored bodies – kind of pretty in the worst sort of way. They are roughly 3/8-inch long and 1/4-inch wide.

WHAT DO I DO ABOUT THEM?

The best defense is a good offense. Japanese beetles are the adult stage of grubs that are found in your lawn earlier in the season. A good lawn program to control grubs applied early in the spring before the beetles emerge is your best bet.  Watering, fertilizing and general good horticultural practices will also help reduce the damage caused by Japanese beetles.

Inevitably though, the beetles still come and there are a couple of options to hold the major damage at bay. Spray affected plants with a pyrethrin-based insecticide the minute you notice them.  This is a safe and effective control that can be used on flowers and vegetables alike.  It will help to control other pests as well.  To make every effort to cause no harm to honeybees with these products, do not apply during hours when bees are actively visiting the flowers.

Neem oil is an “antifeedant”, which when used early on can be an effective tool to reduce feeding.  Chances are you will have to reapply either of these options if the beetles last as late in the season as they are this year.

Another helpful, but disgusting option, is to hand pick them first thing in the morning when temperatures are cooler and they move a bit slower and drop them in a bucket of water containing one tablespoon of liquid dishwashing detergent. If you are diligent about this it is a very effective way to clear your garden of these pests.

Japanese beetle traps are helpful if you have the ability to place them far from your garden.  They actually have an aromatic chemical attractant that brings them to the trap so you don’t want to hang it near the plants you are trying to preserve. japanese beetles

Whatever option you choose – choose something fast! Timeliness and thoroughness of application are very important in controlling the damage or at the very least, keeping it to a bare minimum.

New Lakefront Landscape Gets a Thumbs Up!

Dear Chris,

We want to tell you again how much we like the recent landscaping you did on our waterfront property. Your crew changed a mediocre back yard to one of exquisite beauty as well as being functional. It’s absolutely beautiful and beyond our expectations.

Your men (Marcelino and Louis) did a fantastic job . We were impressed with their professionalism and their work ethic. Please extend to them our sincere thanks.

If you and your company ever need a reference please feel free to ask us.
We would highly recommend you .

Again thank you for making our home just that much more beautiful.

P.S.  Horst also agrees, your guys did a fantastic job!

Sincerely,
Carol and Horst G.

Moultonborough, NH

walkway to dock erosion control landscape erosion control laandscape

Raised Beds in the Lakes Region, NH – Pros and Cons

The first question to ask yourself is, “Do I build raised beds, or plant directly in the ground? Depending on where you live, soil conditions, sunlight, cost and time involved, your answers may vary.  Let’s take a look at some of these factors to help you decide.

1. If the soil where you were hoping to plant is hard-packed, sandy, or rocky then there would be an advantage to building a raised bed and filling it with a healthy mix of topsoil and compost.  Of course the cost of materials and the construction time may be enough to make you dig a little harder and amend the soil in the ground.

raised bed in early spring

raised bed in early spring

2. The raised height can help to keep pets out of your garden and by putting a layer of wire mesh in the bottom, you will likely deter burrowing critters trying to come in from below.  Again, this adds cost to your project.

3. The fresh soil that you would start with should by nature be cleaner and more free of weeds and a raised bed requires no edging to keep grass out. Because of the height, raised beds are generally a bit easier to weed and maintain.

4. Once you commit to raised beds you can get creative with the design and layout.  Check out this article on HOUZZ that details lots of options for materials to use when constructing your raised beds.

http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/16676705/list/8-materials-for-raised-garden-beds

5. Time and Cost are a disadvantage. Planning, building and maintaining season after season takes time and financial investment. Even naturally rot-resistant woods such as red cedar and cypress will eventually need replacing and can be difficult to find. Although today’s pressure treated lumber is no longer made with arsenic, many people still prefer to use untreated wood.

6. Soil temperatures in raised beds will warm sooner than soil in the ground so planting can begin a bit earlier.  It is also easier to cover raised beds should you fear an early or late season frost.

There is certainly a lot to consider when making this choice.  If you know you want raised beds, but don’t have the time or energy to construct them, call Miracle Farms Landscape Contractors and we will help you get the job done. 603-253-9292

raised beds early spring

raised beds early spring