The 2018 Perennial of the Year will have both people and pollinators buzzing with joy! Allium ‘Millenium’ is a relative of the common onion and a standout in a late summer garden here in the Lakes Region of New Hampshire. Blooming at a time when most of the garden begins to fade, it offers a welcome wave of color. It is a low maintenance, dependable perennial that puts out masses of purple blooms above neat, grass-like green foliage that remains long after the flower passes. Hummingbirds, bees, beneficial insects, and butterflies love the flowers, which are laden with pollen and nectar. They grow best in full sun and have a very drought resistant constitution. ‘Millenium’ will grow foliage around 10-15” tall with each scape producing two or three showy two-inch globes of purple florets that will last as long as four weeks.

‘Millenium’ will live happily in USDA zones 4-9. Once established, about the only maintenance it needs is cutting back foliage in late fall after the plants fade. A large mass of ‘Millenium’ looks amazing on it’s own, but it also plays well with others and looks great paired with numerous perennials.  Shorter goldenrods like ‘Little Lemon’ in front and the lacy silver foliage of a Russian Sage behind, would make a lovely show in the garden.

2018 Perennial of the Year Allium ‘Millenium’

No serious pest problems have been reported. Leaf spot may occur in overcrowded growing conditions. Deer and rabbits leave ‘Millenium’ alone. Alliums are sometimes avoided due to their reseeding behavior. Fortunately ‘Millenium’ exhibits 50% reduced seed production, raising less concern for self-sown seedlings. 
Allium ‘Millenium’ has a fibrous root structure forming an ornamental herbaceous clump easily propagated by division. Once in the garden, ‘Millenium’ can easily be lifted and divided in either spring or fall. 
 
The Perennial Plant of the Year showcases a perennial that is a standout among its competitors. Perennials chosen are suitable for a wide range of growing climates, require low maintenance, have multiple-season interest, and are relatively pest/disease-free. If you are looking for an excellent perennial for your next landscape project or something reliable for your gardens, make sure to check out the Perennial Plant of the Year™ archive list. At Miracle Farms we often chose plants on the list of past Perennial of the Year winners to be reliable bloomers year after year.

Here is the list we often choose from:
Previous PPA Perennial Plant of the Year winners:
·      2016 Anemone × hybrida ‘Honorine Jobert’ (windflower)
·      2015 Geranium ‘Biokova’ (dwarf cranesbill, hardy geranium)
·      2014 Panicum virgatum ‘Northwind’ (tall switch grass)
·      2013 Polygonatum odoratum variegatum (Solomon’s seal)
·      2012 Brunnera macrophylla ‘Jack Frost’ (Siberian bugloss)
·      2011 Amsonia hubrichtii (blue star)
·      2010 Baptisia australis (blue false indigo)
·      2009 Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’ (Japanese forest grass)
·      2008 Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (cranesbill, hardy geranium)
·      2007 Nepeta racemosa ‘Walker’s Low’ (catmint)
·      2006 Dianthus ‘Feuerhexe’ (aka ‘Firewitch’) (cheddar pink)
·      2005 Helleborus x hybridus (hellebore, Lenten rose)
·      2004 Athyrium niponicum pictum (Japanese painted fern)
·      2003 Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Becky’ (shasta daisy)
·      2002 Phlox paniculata ‘David’ (garden phlox)
·      2001 Calamagrostis x acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’ (feather reed grass)
·      2000 Scabiosa ‘Butterfly Blue’ (pincushion flower)
·      1999 Rudbeckia fulgida sullivantii ‘Goldsturm’ (black-eyed Susan)
·      1998 Echinacea purpurea ‘Magnus’ (purple coneflower)
·      1997 Salvia x sylvestris ‘Mainacht’ (aka ‘May Night’ ) (wood sage)
·      1996 Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ (beardtongue)
·      1995 Perovskia atriplicifolia (Russian sage)
·      1994 Astilbe ‘Sprite’ (dwarf astilbe)
·      1993 Veronica ‘Sunny Border Blue’ (speedwell)
·      1992 Coreopsis verticillata ‘Moonbeam’ (threadleaf coreopsis)
·      1991 Heuchera micrantha diversifolia ‘Palace Purple’ (coral bells)
·      1990 Phlox stolonifera (creeping phlox)